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Monday, November 24, 2014

CIA Allegedly Transferred STAR GATE to Spy Agency - Page 2

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CIA Allegedly Transferred STAR GATE to Spy Agency
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A year before CIA killed the STAR GATE project, DIA documents show renewed interest in Russian phenomenology, with the discovery of a possible signal-carrying mechanism for psychic phenomena. STAR GATE scientific research was conducted by defense contractor Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC). The final SAIC report mentions various possible mechanisms for signal transmission.

The NSA is conspicuously absent from later-day STAR GATE documents. Incomplete redacting, which is the blacking out of sensitive information, appears to identify a representative from NSA in at least one of the 1994 DIA briefing documents.

If a transmission mechanism was discovered during STAR GATE research, psychic spying would change from HUMINT (human intelligence sources) to SIGINT (signal intelligence sources).

Gus Russo's unnamed source reports strange new developments at the NSA program. According to Russo, "The source says the program encountered problems when when foreign targets were being blocked by an extraterrestrial source that has never been identified."

STAR GATE files prove that DIA psychic spies reported encounters with extraterrestrials during the 1980's. Documents stamped with official CIA declassification ID numbers include drawings of biological entities and descriptions of their locations on Earth, and in space.

Investigator Caryn Anscomb asked Russo to rate the credibility of his human source for the latest NSA revelation. Russo replied, "His speculations are sometimes further than I would go ... But his accuracy re: facts has never been in question."

Some of the most vocal opponents to the possible existence of the NSA psychic-spy program worked with the original STAR GATE projects.

Paul H. Smith, a former DIA source, is the President of IRVA -- the International Remote Viewing Association -- an organization comprised of veterans of previous government programs and next generation private sector psychics. When asked about the NSA program, Smith replied, "If there still actually is one, I have no info on it."

Colonel John B. Alexander, retired, a well known advocate for non-lethal weapons, told Coast to Coast AM host George Noory he doubted the government was currently involved in remote viewing.

"The talent pool is really relatively small ... and most of these people all know each other."

Russo told Starstream Research the NSA remote viewers had received special university-level training.

A major security breach occurred in 1973 when, according to numerous accounts, SRI remote viewers Pat Price and Ingo Swann spied on NSA's Sugar Grove facility in West Virginia.

The tale of this incident was told by CIA's Ken Kress in a 1999 revised version of a formerly secret story written for CIA's internal "Studies in Intelligence," and is recorded in detail in the STAR GATE SRI Final Report for January 1974 to February 1975.

Kress writes, "No maps were permitted, and the subjects were asked to give an immediate response of what they remotely viewed at these coordinates. The subject came back with descriptions which were apparent misses. They both talked about a military-like facility ... To the surprise of the [CIA] OSI officer, he soon discovered a sensitive government installation a few miles from the vacation property. This discovery led to a request to have Price provide information concerning the interior workings of this particular site. All the data produced by the two subjects were reviewed in CIA and the Agency [NSA] concerned."

"Pat Price, who had no military or intelligence background, provided a list of project titles associated with current and past activities including one of extreme sensitivity. Also, the codename of the site was provided. Other information concerning the physical layout of the site was accurate. Some information, such as the names of the people at the site, proved incorrect."

Pages from the SRI report are available for viewing at the Starstream Research web sites.

A few years later, following Price's death, it was alleged by the FBI that Price had been passing information about the SRI research to a private organization. Kress addressed this incident in the 1999 public version of his CIA article:

"In the late 1970s, several years after the project was terminated, I got a secure line call from a person who identified himself as an FBI agent ... The FBI agent proceeded to explain that Pat Price was a member of an organization that was recently raided for documents indicative of illegal activity. The organization was vigorously resisting the government investigation but the raid produced hundreds of files and papers that supported the government ’s allegations. These documents were now in the public domain as part of the discovery process in the legal proceedings. One such file included debriefings of Pat Price about his CIA remote viewing projects ... As the file made clear, Pat, who had signed an official secrecy agreement, would immediately go to his superior in the organization after sessions with me and divulge everything."

Copyright: American Chronicle